Question

I have the following mapping:

public class LogEntryMap
{
    public LogEntryMap()
    {
        Map.Id(x => x.Id).GeneratedBy.Identity();
        Map(x => x.Context).CustomSqlType("varchar").Length(512);
    }
}

However, using SchemaExport to generate the database in SQL Server 2008, the script generated ignores the length so in effect it ends up being a varchar with length of 1:

create table OV_SAC.dbo.[LogEntry] (
    Id BIGINT IDENTITY NOT NULL,
   Context varchar null,
   primary key (Id)
)

.CustomSqlType("varchar 512") throws an exception. And without defining the CustomSqlType, strings are mapped to nvarchar (which does respect the Length property).

Any suggestions?

Was it helpful?

Solution

Use .CustomType("AnsiString") instead of default "String" and NHibernate will use varchar instead of nvarchar.

OTHER TIPS

If you wanted all of your strings to be mapped to varchar instead of nvarchar you could consider using a convention:

/// <summary>
/// Ensures that all of our strings are stored as varchar instead of nvarchar.
/// </summary>
public class OurStringPropertyConvention : IPropertyConvention
{
    public void Apply(IPropertyInstance instance)
    {
        if (instance.Property.PropertyType == typeof (string))
            instance.CustomType("AnsiString");
    }
}

You mappings could then go back to a simple mapping:

Map(x => x.Context);

Just make sure you remember to tell Fluent NH to use the convention:

        var configuration = new Configuration();
        configuration.Configure();
        Fluently
            .Configure(configuration)
            .Mappings(m => m.FluentMappings
                .AddFromAssemblyOf<Widget>()
                .Conventions.Add<OurStringPropertyConvention>()
                )
            .BuildSessionFactory();

Doh.

Map(x => x.Context).CustomSqlType("varchar (512)");

create table OV_SAC.dbo.[LogEntry] (
    Id BIGINT IDENTITY NOT NULL,
   Context varchar (512) null,
   primary key (Id)
)

We found using the "CustomType("AnsiString")" option does prevent it from using the nvarchar, however, it sets the field length of 8000 for a column that is specified as varchar(30). The 8000 varchar is much faster than 4000 nvarchar, but it is still causing huge problems with sql server overhead.

Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
Not affiliated with StackOverflow